Everything you read in the press is a lie (so don’t let it bother you too much)

I’m catching up on my reading at the end of the week, and I ran across this truly epic comment stream on Pando Daily:
Read more ›

The fracas was started by Pando leaking an unpublished blog post by
Chris Sacca, criticizing the politics and backstabbing at Twitter.

Side note: You should never be surprised by politics and backstabbing.
When millions of dollars are at stake, you’ll discover the ugly side of
humanity:
Read more at TechCrunch ›

The real action starts in the comments, however, as various dignitaries
such as Marc Canter, Chris, and Jason Calacanis get into a massive
flame war with Owen Thomas.

The thing is, I’ve never understood
why people get worked up over the press. Everything you read in the
press is a lie. Expecting the press to reflect reality is simply
begging for aggravation.

Here’s how I explain it:

“Have you or a friend ever been written about in the media? Yes? Okay, was the story accurate?”

The answer is always no. Every story gets it wrong.

So why do you expect it to be different.

If someone starts to lie or libel you, respond politely but firmly, and take the high road.

Don’t feed the trolls.

Once you accept that the press is going to lie about you anyways, you
can get past the instinctive emotional reaction to fight back, and
instead pursue a calm and considered course of action that will reflect
well on you, and ill on the misbegotten curs whose addled yelping fills
those disgraceful excuses for journalism.*

* Just in case you were wondering…that was humor!

2 thoughts on “Everything you read in the press is a lie (so don’t let it bother you too much)

  1. Anonymous

    Hi, this is adrea bargnani from wages of wins comments section. I believe I have the privilige of asking you a question by email. Could you contact me at your convinience pls. Thanks, good luck.

  2. Anonymous

    Your comment copied below is absolutely spot on. After many years in the entertainment industry, entertainment-related articles, and even reviews, generally get it right for the most part; news and feature articles? Not so much. Not even close.

    Just like cops, not all journalists are bad. Still, fairly regularly and far too often for comfort, you encounter a journalist who could give a damn about the facts and takes an angle just short of outright character assassination.

    For instance, if someone is a non-smoker, but the writer has decided someone "distasteful" would add color to the story, he might end a paragraph with a description of the Frisbee-sized ashtray overflowing with cigarette butts and two weeks worth of liquor bottles laying helter-skelter "nearby".

    (Nevermind the interview took place in a family restaurant like Appleby's and a party of 12 left the ashtray, cigarette, butts, and liquor bottles sitting on the table next to your booth when they left.)

    Then, after blowing smoke about booze, "innocently" relate the first two words in the next paragraph to your name: Chris Yeh appears very much like a man who likes to eat and drink when he can. …
    +++
    Or something.

    "Have you or a friend ever been written about in the media? Yes? Okay, was the story accurate?"

    The answer is always no. Every story gets it wrong.

    So why do you expect it to be different. "
    ++++
    You might get more comments if your re-captcha weren't so difficult to decipher.

Leave a Reply to Anonymous Cancel reply

Your email address will not be published.