It’s Cheaper In The Long Run To Pay For A Professional

I firmly believe in the truth of the old saying, “It’s cheaper in the long run to pay for a professional.”  It’s an axiom that applies in nearly any situation, from decide whether or not to attempt to fix your own plumbing problems, to dealing with groupies if you’re a young All-Star. Yet while most … Continue reading It’s Cheaper In The Long Run To Pay For A Professional

The Mobile Gold Rush Has Just Begun

Mary Meeker is one of the few folks who was a leading figure during the first dot com boom who is still playing a similar role.  (Contrast her with Mark Andreesen, who back then was the wunderkind behind Netscape, and today is an elder statesman and VC) That’s actually a good thing, because she continues … Continue reading The Mobile Gold Rush Has Just Begun

Why “Enterprise SaaS” may soon be a misnomer

One of the most exciting developments to hit the enterprise software world in decades was the rise of SaaS.  Companies like Salesforce.com blazed a trail that built enormous amounts of wealth and improved the lives of end-users. Prior to SaaS, most enterprise software was sold based on perpetual licenses, to CIOs and IT departments, with … Continue reading Why “Enterprise SaaS” may soon be a misnomer

If Tumblr is worth $1.1 Billion, is Pinterest worth $19 Billion

My friend Adam Rifkin, who runs the awesome PandaWhale (where I get a ton of my news), recently wrote about the Tumblr acquisition for AllThingsD.  It’s a smart and well-reasoned essay, which is well worth reading: http://dthin.gs/113xmz8 His basic argument is that Tumble is valuable because it is a massive interest graph: “Tumblr is one … Continue reading If Tumblr is worth $1.1 Billion, is Pinterest worth $19 Billion

The one number (45) that explains Constant Contact’s success

The Business of Software Conference sounds like a phenomenal event.  I haven’t attended it, but I did recently run across one of the sessions from their 2012 conference, a talk by Gail Goodman, the CEO of Constant Contact: For those who don’t know, Constant Contact is a publicly traded online marketing company with over 500,000 … Continue reading The one number (45) that explains Constant Contact’s success

The value of a signal is inversely proportional to its frequency

In recent months, a host of startups have arisen that help keep me informed about my friends’ information habits. We’ve gone far beyond the days when we could simply follow people via RSS or Twitter…now our RSS readers and Twitter homepages are so choked with information that we generally only view a tiny subset. I … Continue reading The value of a signal is inversely proportional to its frequency

The Only Kind of Product That Can Pull Off Freemium

The Wall Street Journal finally picks up on the freemium trend (it’s only been 2-3 years, right?):Read more at the Wall Street Journal › The problem is, anyone reading the article is probably under the impression that what succeeds and what doesn’t is an art, not a science. It quotes one entrepreneur as saying: “He … Continue reading The Only Kind of Product That Can Pull Off Freemium

The Future of Music is Crowdfunding

I have seen the future of music, and it is crowdfunding. This weekend, I ran across a Kickstarter project for Amanda Palmer’s new album. Three relevant facts: 1) Until this weekend, I had never heard of Amanda Palmer, and I imagine that’s true for most of you. 2) The average advance that a major studio … Continue reading The Future of Music is Crowdfunding

Bought vs. Sold (Why Jive is a dinosaur & Dropbox is the future)

Both Dropbox and Jive are successful companies that are much in the news recently. Jive just filed its S1 for its IPO, while Dropbox raised its first major round of funding at a $4 billion valuation. What’s most interesting to me is that they represent polar opposites in terms of business models. They illustrate the … Continue reading Bought vs. Sold (Why Jive is a dinosaur & Dropbox is the future)